Paediatric vaccination day

I had no idea Haiti could feel so cold. The rain has cooled us down so much that sleeping in my fleece jacket provided very little warmth. We were woken up a few times throughout the night by the storm and local animals. The midnight and 2am wake-up calls have convinced me that the roosters here are confused. Fortunately, we were greeted with two hot pots of coffee this morning.  I had no idea Haiti could feel so cold. The rain has cooled us down so much that sleeping in my fleece jacket provided very little warmth. We were woken up a few times throughout the night by the storm and local animals. The midnight and 2am wake-up calls have convinced me that the roosters here are confused. Fortunately, we were greeted with two hot pots of coffee this morning.

Today was our first pediatric vaccination clinic.

We set up at the school right around the corner from the guest house near the clinic in Bod Me Limbe. It didn’t take long to get situated, but there seemed to be no patients ready for us.

Emily and I jumped at the opportunity to watch Dr. Brinvert drain an abscess. Apparently, a woman had sustained a minor injury to her thumb right before Christmas, and despite the treatment she received in Limbe, an infection had spread up her wrist. There was very little pus to drain, but Dr. Brinvert did an incredible job of removing most of the necrotic tissue in her thumb. I was amazed by what he was able to accomplish despite the very limited resources at the clinic. He used a small razor to make the incision and an iodine ointment to sanitize the area. The woman will return every day to have more pus drained and tissue removed.

When I returned to the school, I began scribing for Lily. I was excited to see that most of the children had received all of their vaccinations.

Apparently, vaccinating your children in the village is rewarded with a free chicken. Seems like a win-win.

Most of our patients presented with Malaria and worms. There were a few cases of pneumonia and a few infections, but they were very healthy compared to the patient population I had encountered on my last trip to Haiti. Unfortunately, only about 50 of the anticipated 80 patients showed up to clinic because of the rain.

After lunch, the team was taken on a hike by Cholo, our pharmacist. We traveled through another local village, down the beach, and circled our way back to the Haiti Village Health guest house. The hike was just beautiful. We encountered a variety of wildlife and established a small entourage of children for a while. When we returned, the rain started coming down. We played with some of the children in the village until dinner and concluded the night with some banana grams.

Kaylyn Utly


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